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Most solemn, orderly Nazarene procession

A CAROSA carrying the image of the Black Nazarene moves freely while being escorted by a throng of police officers along Quezon Boulevard in Quiapo, Manila, Monday midnight. This year’s annual thanksgiving procession is the most solemn and orderly, according to church officials.
A CAROSA carrying the image of the Black Nazarene moves freely while being escorted by a throng of police officers along Quezon Boulevard in Quiapo, Manila, Monday midnight. This year’s annual thanksgiving procession is the most solemn and orderly, according to church officials.
A CAROSA carrying the image of the Black Nazarene moves freely while being escorted by a throng of police officers along Quezon Boulevard in Quiapo, Manila, Monday midnight. This year’s annual thanksgiving procession is the most solemn and orderly, according to church officials.

The thanksgiving procession of the image of the Black Nazarene this year took only less than two hours and is considered as the most solemn and orderly.

The revered image left Quiapo Church before 12 midnight Monday and was able to return before 2 a.m.

And according to Quiapo Church rector Msgr. Hernando Coronel, this year’s procession was record-breaking.

“The procession finished at 0124H with a record-breaking duration of 1 hour, 40 minutes, and 39 seconds to complete the 2.37Km route,” he said in an interview.

Coronel said this year’s procession was also “solemn and orderly.”
“This is the most solemn and orderly,” he said.

“The procession took off orderly. There was no istandarte nor unruly mob that used to climb the andas,” added Coronel.

Even those who followed the event via the Facebook page of Quiapo Church also observed the same thing.

“It was orderly hope it will always be like that,” read one of the comments.

This year’s procession also saw certain changes with devotees following the carroza of the Nazareno now carrying candles.

“There are prayer stations along the way. Everyone had candles and praying the Rosary,” said Coronel.

“The thanksgiving procession tried to emulate the Sto. Niño procession in Cebu and the Peñafrancia procession in Bicol,” he added.

Policemen were also positioned on the front, rear, and flanks as well as on the whole route of the procession.

When asked if they will also implement the same thing during the “Traslacion” procession of the Black Nazarene on January 9, Coronel said they still need to consult the leaders of Hijos del Nazareno.

“We will consult our Hijos leaders,” said Coronel.

After the procession, devotees lined up to be near the Nazareno in the patio area.

According to Coronel, the procession was participated by approximately 64,250 devotees and 7,200 uniformed officers and 150 medical and safety personnel from government agencies and volunteer organizations.

The Thanksgiving procession was held days before the annual traslacion procession which usually last for several hours.

The “traslacion” commemorates the transfer of the Black Nazarene from Bagumbayan (old Intramuros) to Quiapo Church. (Leslie Ann Aquino) 

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Written by Tempo Desk

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